Summer Business Program: Week 2 part 1

Our guest blogger, Quinn, is back with more from SBP.  I’ve asked her to share a brief bio this week as well.  ENJOY!

Quinn Korzeniecki is a senior English major with a Pre-Business concentration. She is editor-in-chief of The Advocate, a progressive online publication at Holy Cross, and works as an assistant in the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs Office. As a participant in the Summer Business Program, she hopes to learn more about marketing and advertising aspects of business. Quinn aspires to enter into publishing either in the editorial, marketing, or advertising departments.

On Friday, we learned about something for which my dad would be very proud of me if I could only accomplish it: personal finance, investments, and mutual funds. Professor Anderton taught us all about the similarities and differences between stocks and bonds. He stressed the importance of setting up a financial plan to control spending after graduation. Also, we discussed how profitable long-term investments can be especially if we start at our young age. Because of this workshop, I plan on saving the first significant amount of spare cash that I earn, investing it in stocks, and praying that in 50 years it will amount to 5 million dollars like it did for Susan Smith in the example. Hey, a girl can dream.

Along the same lines of personal finance, Professor Chu lead Monday’s workshop on accounting. We learned more about the individual shareholder’s piece of profit from stocks in the company. In the afternoon we learned about the terminology needed to understand the business world in general: one of the most interesting things I learned was that companies are obliged to report risk factors to the Security Exchange Commission. Therefore, when we had to list the cons of investing in the insulin pump company Insulet we realized that a natural disaster like the tornadoes that recently tore through Massachusetts could demolish the company’s only storage warehouse. Yet, sometimes the future benefits outweigh the present risks, and my group ultimately decided that we would invest in Insulet.

Monday night we enjoyed a banquet-style dinner and discussion with Peter Mondani, VP of Human Resources for General Electric, who taught us about business models, personal branding, and careers. We learned that it is best to “influence without authority” by changing the opinions and viewpoints of others although you’re not in an authority position. Exude confidence but admit to making mistakes and learn from them. Also, apparently we women get red necks during interviews when we get nervous. I guess I’m “investing” in a scarf for my quickly approaching job interviews!

Tuesday afternoon focused on the job/internship search and networking. I found this particularly helpful since I’m entering my senior year and feel helpless in planning for the real world. I learned the best way to reach out to alumni and maintain informal and beneficial relationships. All in all, I’ve learned how to balance my personal finances, invest in stocks and bonds, and plan for attaining my first full-time job.

Wednesday we learn about what it means to work in finance: don’t let the English major fool you, I also enjoy math!

Keep an eye out for Quinn’s posts throughout the month!

Kaithlyn

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate Director, Entrepreneurial Studies

David Chu
Director, Entrepreneurial Studies & Pre-business Advisor

The Power of Possibility

While I’m not going to do this justice, Sheila Cavanaugh’s presentation on Tuesday night was too inspiring for me to not attempt to post some of her message.

When you wake up every morning, remember that you’ll never have another today.  Make it worth it.  The rest of you life is a question mark, so make sure you don’t settle.

If you don’t have a job the day you graduate, don’t fret. Keep at it. Things happen for a reason.  You’ll find a job and, more often than not, another after that.

Just because you work in the corporate world, doesn’t mean you can’t serve your community.  Companies have community outreach and development programs that do wonderful things locally and globally.

In a world full of criticism, take time to praise others.  Years ago, Sheila decided to start a movement to write letters of thanks and praise to help balance out the letters of disappointment and anger companies often receive.  Try to make your positive comments outnumber the negative.

Every person you meet in life is there to serve a purpose – to teach, to learn, to inspire, to challenge – don’t underestimate each interaction.  You might be passing up the chance to develop a life-long relationship.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg, so don’t miss Sheila the next time she visits campus.

That about wraps up our workshops and dinner speakers for the semester.  Stay tuned for posts about Prof. Chu’s financial portfolio class, CAM, and the Finance bootcamp we have in the works!

Kaithlyn

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate Director, Entrepreneurial Studies

David Chu
Director, Entrepreneurial Studies & Pre-business Advisor

Summer Business Program – 4 weeks to pave the way for the next 40 years of your life

We had a great turn out at Monday night’s Summer Business Program Info Session, but if you missed it here’s what you should know.

What you can expect to gain from SBP – Our Mission:

•       Leadership development and team building – skills you NEED on your resume

•       Moral values and ethical business practices – how Holy Cross students stand out

•       Functional and personal business skills –  your foot in the door to Wall Street and finance

•       Starting and managing a business – business plans, marketing, & growing your business

•       Team project  – practically applying what you are learning during the program

•       Visit to local business – seeing business in action in central, MA

Program Logistics:

•       Open to approximately 30 students

•       Housing in either Alumni or Carlin residence halls

•       Taught by alumni and some faculty – real world teachers who work in the business everyday

•       Daily interactive classes in the new science building, 9-12, 1-4 PM

•       Weekends free

•       Work on team project outside of class – your teams will meet in your free time

Team Project break down:

•       6 teams @ 5 per team – less or more depending on our applicant pool

•       1 executive mentor per team – a business executive to guide your project

•       Team Exec decides project/role of team – working to real expectations and deadlines set by Exec

•       1 meeting per week with your Team Executive (face-to-face or phone)

•       Dry run June 23

•       Team presentations June 24 – CASH PRIZE to winners

The Benefits of participating in SBP:

•       Comprehensive business education – a business background with your Liberal Arts degree

•       Skill sets: leadership, team, presentation

•       Networking – meet successful HC alum throughout the business world

•       Differentiation – stand out from your peers at HC with this on your resume

What’s this going to cost you:

•       $1,600—room and course materials

•       $1,400—commuter discount

•       Scholarships available

•       We DO NOT provide meals —Cool Beans, Crossroads, off-campus eateries, supermarkets

•       Cars allowed on campus – summer permits provided

How to apply:

•       Deadline: Friday, April 15, 11:59 p.m.

•       Online application, attach cover letter, resume, transcript

•       One recommendation letter

•       Interview

Let us know if you have any questions.  The Summer Business Program is a chance for you to stand-out in your interviews and prepare yourself for a fulfilling career in business.

We’ll see you there!

Kaithlyn

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate Director, Entrepreneurial Studies

David Chu
Director, Entrepreneurial Studies & Pre-business Advisor

ELW Winners!

Congratulations to the members of Team 4!

This winning team presented a business plan for a company they named “PoolA Palooza.”

This service would allow inground pool owners to utilize the area of their pool during the fall, winter and spring months by installing a safe and effective covering system.  Their cheery slogan “Take back your backyard” concluded a very professional presentation.

Our panel of distinguished alum declared them the winners, with a 3-way tie for second place.  They announced that all of the teams presented very innovative, creative, and organized proposals.

The week wrapped up nicely with a closing banquet, where students could relax and interact with our panel of mock “venture capitalists,” and murmurs of applying to the Summer Business Program passed throughout the room.

The only questions left is: How do you want to return from your Spring Break next year – Sunburnt or Successful?

Kaithlyn

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate Director, Entrepreneurial Studies

David Chu
Director, Entrepreneurial Studies & Pre-business Advisor

From inside the Executive Leadership Workshop

40 students are dressed in business attire, they’ve already sat through an hour and a half of valuation presentations, they are neck deep in the financial data for Kayak and Google — and it’s only 10 a.m. on day 2!

Over the course of the week, these adventurous students (who have opted out of the typical Spring Break vacation) will get an intensive view of how to build, grow, and sustain a company.

Their teachers are Holy Cross alum that coming back to campus to share their stories and introduce important business techniques that will help these students be more prepared for jobs in the business world.

The schedule looks something like this:

Monday: Starting A Company

Tuesday: Valuing and Growing a Company

Wednesday: Business Market Game

Thursday: Managing the Momentum of a Global Enterprise

Friday:  …. is a little different.

On Sunday night, the students were broken into teams and given the task of (over the course of only this week) creating a business geared towards the 30-45 year old demographic.  Each team is responsible for coming up with a new idea, creating a business plan and presenting their business to an executive panel that will pick a winning team at the end of the week.

Friday morning, all 8 teams, will present their plans in hopes of being the victor!

We’ll update you on Friday afternoon with the results!

Kaithlyn

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate Director, Entrepreneurial Studies

David Chu
Director, Entrepreneurial Studies & Pre-business Advisor

10 Etiquette Tips for the Young Professional

All information provided by Mannersmith

1.       The Hand Shake.

Hands should be placed web to web in a firm grasp.  2-3 shakes (any longer and it gets awkward).

2.       The Art of Conversation.

Be prepared with a few interesting things to add to any conversation (ie. Books you’ve read or an event you’ve recently attended).  Be sure to ask open ended questions to create lasting conversation.

3.       The Compliment.

Make sure to accept compliments with a thank you and a smile.  Avoid attempting to down-play the compliment with a negative response to avoid attention. Accept it, appreciate it, and move on.

4.       The Business Suit – For women

Skirt suits are considered more formal than pants. Make sure to tailor every suit – fit really makes a difference.  Skirts should always fall at the bottom or top of the knee, no higher.  Remember that the person wearing the most clothing holds the power, so plan accordingly with dark tights or long sleeves.

5.       The Business Suit – For men

Pants with cuffs are considered more formal than those without cuffs.  When determining the number of buttons on your jacket, remember that the shorter the V created by the top of the jacket, the shorter you appear. Sleeves should cover your wrist bone, but not much longer (you don’t want them falling mid-hand).  Shirts without buttons on the collars are considered more formal than those with.

6.       The Color Scheme.

Know what the color of your shirt, tie, suit, or accessory is saying about you.

Dark Purple = royalty, power & money

Green = money

Pink = calm

Red = power

Navy = trust

Brown/Orange = friendly

7.        The Early Departure/Late Arrival.

If you are invited to an event and you have to leave early or arrive late, inform the host prior to the event.  This can help the host plan around your schedule and alert other guests as necessary.

8.       The Dietary Restriction.

If you are invited to a dinner and you have any specific dietary restrictions, make sure to inform the host as early as possible so that he or she can plan accordingly. Failing to do so could end in you not eating and a very embarrassed host.

9.       The Active Listener.

When engaging in conversation, make sure to be attentive and responsive.  Eye contact is very important, but be careful not to stare. A well placed nod can go a long way.  Make sure to ask pointed questions to display you are engaged in the conversation.

10.   The Thank You Note.

Never underestimate the value of the handwritten thank you note. While an email may be sufficient, a handwritten letter says you took the time to care.

Enjoy!

Kaithlyn

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate Director, Entrepreneurial Studies

David Chu
Director, Entrepreneurial Studies & Pre-business Advisor

Presentation is everything.

Disclaimer: This is the post where I shamelessly plug my new workshop, which happens to be on Monday night.

As Holy Cross students, you’ve been given a great foundation in presentation skills.  All of you write and speak very well.  You are a step ahead of the majority of your peers.  I’ve seen several of you brush elbows with some extremely powerful people and make comfortable, interesting, and (most importantly) educated conversation.  You have plenty to say and possess resumes that can open most doors. Give yourselves a hand—I was thoroughly impressed with the caliber of HC students when I started here in September.

Then I participated in the ELW interviews…

Don’t worry. I’m still impressed by your professionalism. But there is always room for improvement in your interview skills.

Here’s where my new workshop comes in.  After sitting through almost 60 interviews, I have started to see that most of you fall victim to filler words (like, um, uh) and nervous habits (tapping toes, twisting pens, playing with your hair—yes ladies, I am talking to you!) when speaking in public.  This workshop will address these issues and help make all of you more polished interviewers and presenters.

The details:

I’m offering a one-hour workshop in which a few volunteers will present three-minute talks and be critiqued by their peers and myself.

We’ll record each presentation so we can review point-by-point with each presenter.  All criticism will be constructive, but it will give you all a chance to really look at how you come across to a crowd and get some insight from others about how to up your game.

If this workshop is successful, I’ll offer a series of smaller workshops so everyone can have a chance to practice.  We can work on both presentation and interview skills.  Please don’t confuse this program with Career Planning’s mock interviews.  We are not working on content, only on form.  Your presentation can be on your love of Kraft macaroni & cheese—I don’t care. The plan is to flush out distracting movements and superfluous words that take away from the content of your presentation.

So mark your calendars: Monday, January 31 at 7 p.m. in Smith Labs 155.

If you want to volunteer to “go first,” send me an email or RSVP on our Facebook event page.

Since presentation is everything and practice makes perfect, I hope to see all of you there.

Kaithlyn

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate Director, Entrepreneurial Studies

David Chu
Director, Entrepreneurial Studies & Pre-business Advisor