A through Z Index  | Search  | Campus Directory  | Calendars Log In
About Holy Cross Admissions Academics Student Life Administration Athletics

Posts Tagged ‘non-profit’

Women in Business 2011

November 8th, 2011 by kkayer

On Saturday, October 22, we hosted the sixth annual Women in Business conference here on campus.  With over 150 alumnae and students in attendance, the conference was a huge hit!  The Prebusiness office wants to thank the student organizers  Juliana Biolsi ’12, Kristen Buonassisi ’12, Lauren McCarthy ’12, Christie Cannone ’14, Haley O’Brien ’13, Stephanie Pajak ’13, and Lauren Esposito ’14, for their hard-work and dedication to this event.

If you weren’t able to attend, Juliana and Kristen wrote a great recap for the Holy Cross website:

Women in Business Conference Continues to Inspire Students, Alumnae

Save the date for next year’s conference: October 20, 2012!

As always, don’t forget to “Like” us on FACEBOOK and look for our WIB, SBP and ELW groups on LinkedIN!

Kaithlyn

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate Director, Entrepreneurial Studies

David Chu
Director, Entrepreneurial Studies & Pre-business Advisor

The Power of Possibility

April 7th, 2011 by kkayer

While I’m not going to do this justice, Sheila Cavanaugh’s presentation on Tuesday night was too inspiring for me to not attempt to post some of her message.

When you wake up every morning, remember that you’ll never have another today.  Make it worth it.  The rest of you life is a question mark, so make sure you don’t settle.

If you don’t have a job the day you graduate, don’t fret. Keep at it. Things happen for a reason.  You’ll find a job and, more often than not, another after that.

Just because you work in the corporate world, doesn’t mean you can’t serve your community.  Companies have community outreach and development programs that do wonderful things locally and globally.

In a world full of criticism, take time to praise others.  Years ago, Sheila decided to start a movement to write letters of thanks and praise to help balance out the letters of disappointment and anger companies often receive.  Try to make your positive comments outnumber the negative.

Every person you meet in life is there to serve a purpose – to teach, to learn, to inspire, to challenge – don’t underestimate each interaction.  You might be passing up the chance to develop a life-long relationship.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg, so don’t miss Sheila the next time she visits campus.

That about wraps up our workshops and dinner speakers for the semester.  Stay tuned for posts about Prof. Chu’s financial portfolio class, CAM, and the Finance bootcamp we have in the works!

Kaithlyn

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate Director, Entrepreneurial Studies

David Chu
Director, Entrepreneurial Studies & Pre-business Advisor

Where Business and Service Meet

February 24th, 2011 by kkayer

For all of the soul-searching, job-seeking seniors.

I have found that, upon graduation from a liberal arts institution, students are left with two common goals: “I want to make a difference in the world” and “I want to make a lot of money.”  This is bound to happen because in any notable liberal arts curriculum, students are conditioned to be both socially responsible and professionally successful.  More often than not, graduates are left choosing between taking that steady analyst position at a large corporate firm and teaching English in an impoverished South African village (believe me, I’ve been there. Choosing to go to graduate school to postpone making a decision may not have been my most enlightened solution).  These options might seem like completely opposite ends of the employment spectrum.  The truth is, though, that being successful professionally (in terms of both job title and salary) and making a global difference are NOT mutually exclusive.

Jobs serving the betterment of the community are not limited to government and non-profit organizations.  Despite common misconceptions, careers in business have just as much to offer the global community.  If a “higher moral calling” exists in the public (government) and social (non-profit) sectors, it exists in the business sector as well.   The truth is that “You can make a vital contribution in any of these three sectors, because all three are needed for a society to function well.  (If just one sector is weak or absent, the result is usually a failed state.  Think of the former communist states that tried doing away with private business, or the chaotic warlord states without effective government.)”  And while many are put off by the “corruption of corporate business,” keep in mind that there are dozens of examples of both virtue and vice in each sector.  No one sector monopolizes either corruption or morality. It is important to remember that goodness lies within the individual and in the moral decisions those individuals make regarding their work, not in any particular industry.

I recently read the book Half the Sky, which promotes the humanitarian organization by the same name.  The Half the Sky Organization is a non-profit that works to fight global poverty by unlocking women’s power as economic catalysts — transforming teenage girls from brothel slaves into successful businesswomen.  This non-profit organization is using entrepreneurial and business practices to fight extremism and poverty around the globe.  Yes, Half the Sky is a non-profit organization, but it is bolstering the business sector and suggesting (quite convincingly) that entrepreneurial endeavors, combined with education, are the most effective way to combat poverty.

The fact of the matter is that business strengthens a community.  It creates jobs, which in turn allows for the economic growth and security of individuals, their families, and by extension their entire community.  By entering the business sector and engaging in socially responsible business practices, you are making an irrefutable social contribution.

When it comes time to make a decision about your career path, I’m not suggesting that the business sector is the only place to look; however, I do ask that you not overlook it either.  Armed with your Liberal Arts degree, you have the tools to succeed in any job you choose and, with that ability, to better your life and the lives of those around you.  No matter what sector you find yourself in, you can make a difference in the world and be professionally successful at the same time.

Until next time!

Kaithlyn

Kaithlyn Kayer
Associate Director, Entrepreneurial Studies

David Chu
Director, Entrepreneurial Studies & Pre-business Advisor

Excerpts from “Where Goodness Lies: An Open Letter to College Students” by Judith Cone, Vice President, Emerging Strategies, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.
All information about Half the Sky Organization is property of Halfthesky.org

Prebusiness is proudly powered by WordPress MU running on Holy Cross Blogs. Create a new blog and join in the fun!
Entries (RSS) and Comments (RSS).